Metal Earth Models

 

 

All of my models were designed by Fascinations, Inc., and assembled by myself. Those interested should visit http://www.fascinations.com/, or visit your local hobby store and ask whether they carry Metal Earth models. 😉

I have enjoyed putting these models together quite a bit, which is why there are so many of them, I suppose. They take a little while to put together, but not too bad. A single sheet model, like the WW1 airplane or the Checker Cab, might take less than an hour; on the other hand, complicated models with small pieces like the CAT models or Notre Dame can take much longer. Actually, since I generally only work on models for an hour or so a day, it can take me several days to complete more complex models. Incidentally, that silver dragon was three large sheets, with lots of small parts. It took me quite a while… but it was really satisfying to finish. 🙂

I’ve also been asked whether I’ve ever injured myself putting these models together. I admit, my thumbs can get a bit sore from holding the metal edges, but I’ve only had one model actually pierce my skin. I think it was St. Basil’s, but I can’t quite remember, it might have been the dragon. Meh, but it didn’t even bleed, so does it even count? I wonder. I experimented with wearing gloves for a while, but it was mostly to keep fingerprints off the nice shiny surfaces, not to protect my fingertips. Unfortunately, I couldn’t really find any cloth gloves I could be happy with, and the latex gloves are uncomfortable to use, cause my hands to get sweaty, and are relatively easily pierced by metal tabs. So I gave up. 😛

My advice, if you decide to start making your own models, is to start small with single sheet models, which tend to be less complicated and more forgiving of mistakes. That Checker Cab, for instance, is dead easy, so it’s a good place to start. I would suggest having metal tweezers, since bending metal tabs with your bare fingers is a bit painful. 😉 A small needlenose pliers will help a lot, especially once you need to round out small pieces like wheels on tanks, and various other bits. Metal Earth actually sells a set of three tools, which includes a normal pliers, a needlenose, and a metal snip for cutting the pieces out of the sheets. That snip makes things extremely easier, incidentally, so it’s the one tool I would say is invaluable if you end up doing lots of models like me. If you just do one or two, stick with tweezers, they are much cheaper. 😉

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